Speech Therapy Forum

 

Asking & Answering Questions

Being able to ask and answer questions is an integral part of academic success for several reasons.  The first is that many teachers measure children’s classroom participation by the number of questions they answer correctly in class.  Another reason is that asking questions is one of the primary ways that children obtain knowledge about their world and what is beyond their immediate experience.   

Children who are unable to ask questions are at a disadvantage when it comes to getting directions or information explained to them in a way they better understand.  Also, their ability to communicate with others is significantly reduced.

 

Children who cannot answer questions effectively often have trouble making their thoughts and ideas understood by others.  Being able to answer questions about remote events, places, people, and stories is a necessary classroom skill that all children need in order to be successful at school.  

Therefore, it is important to give children opportunities to practice asking and answering questions in therapy.  Often these skills can be encouraged simply by regularly reading books and encouraging children to ask and answer questions about the stories.  However, when children are having problems learning these skills naturally, learning how to ask and answer questions can be taught more directly.

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